Data Definitions & Information

We’re here to support you to understand the data

OHI Data Navigator is based on data from the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI), managed by StatsNZ. The IDI includes data sources from surveys such as Te Kupenga and the General Social Survey, along with administrative data from government agencies and departments.

The figures presented in the data explorer are not official statistics. The opinions, findings, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in the data explorer are those of the authors, not Statistics NZ or individual data suppliers.

Access to the anonymised data used in this study was provided by Statistics NZ under the security and confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act 1975. Only people authorised by the Statistics Act 1975 are allowed to see data about a particular person, household, business, or organisation, and the results in this presentation have been confidentialised to protect these groups from identification and to keep their data safe.

Careful consideration has been given to the privacy, security, and confidentiality issues associated with using administrative and survey data in the IDI. Further detail can be found in the Privacy Impact Assessment for the Integrated Data Infrastructure available from www.stats.govt.nz.

Māori Data Sovereignty

The IDI data that forms the basis of this data explorer is largely deficit-driven – being administrative data gathered by government agencies in the course of their interactions with young people. This presents a challenge to the creators and users of the explorer. We have tried to tread the fine line between strength-based youth development principles and recognising the social and structural drivers that influence exclusion and disadvantage.

Further, the IDI data, with the exception of Te Kupenga, reflects a Pākehā system. To help keep this mahi focussed on the aspirations of Māori, principles of Māori Data Sovereignty have guided the analytical work. Māori data sovereignty is about establishing and giving life to a clear set of principles that uphold the mana of rangatahi, centring them in the context of their whānau and communities. Māori data sovereignty recognises Māori rights and interests in IDI and survey data, providing a basis for the ethical use of this data to enhance the wellbeing of our people, language and culture.

 

Principles of Māori Data Sovereignty derive from the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, and unique relationships with land, water and the natural world. These rights are recognised in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Our approach to the data

Data maintenance schedule

The data presented in the data explorer will be updated annually. These updates will use the March refresh of the IDI.

If there are other data sources that you would like to see incorporated in this tool, you can contact ThrivingRangatahi@vodafone.com to discuss future requirements and how your needs can be met.

OHI Data Dictionary

This dictionary provides users definitions of how we define the parameters used in the data navigator. These definitions will support you as a user navigate and contextualise the data you are seeing on the Dashboard. 

For the purposes of the data navigator, the population of interest has been defined as all young people aged 12-25 usually resident in Aotearoa.

Interactions with the care and protection system are derived from Oranga Tamariki data, and have been divided into ‘High-level’ and other interactions.

High-level interactions:

  • Abuse finding
  • Placement
  • Court preparation

 

Other interactions:

  • Assessment
  • Family Group Conference
  • Family/Whānau Agreement
  • Intake
  • Partnered Response
  • Safety Assessment
  • Justice interactions

Interactions with the justice system are derived from Ministry of Justice, Corrections and Police data, and have been divided into ‘High-level’ and other interactions.

High-level interactions:

  • Corrections sentencing
  • Court case
  • Recorded as a victim of crime
  • Recorded as an offender of crime
  • Youth Justice placement
  • Youth Justice court preparation

 

Other interactions:

  • Youth Justice Family Group Conference
  • Youth Justice intake
  • Police contact record – family violence
  • Police contact record – other
  • Education and Employment disadvantage
Disadvantage in education and employment is derived from Ministry of Education, Tertiary Education Commission and Ministry of Social Development data, and have been divided into ‘High-level’ and other disadvantage. These differ by age stage, due to the different needs and expectations of rangatahi as they mature. 12-15 years old, high-level:
  • Not enrolled in education
  • Current-year non-enrolment truancy intervention
  • Current-year stand-down or suspension from school
  • Enrolled in alternative education
12-15 years old, other:
  • Any previous truancy intervention
  • Any previous stand-down or suspension from school
16-18 years old, high-level:
  • More than 60 days benefit entitlement this year
  • Enrolled in alternative education
  • 18 year-olds with no NCEA qualification
16-18 years old, other:
  • Between 30 and 60 days benefit entitlement this year
  • Any previous truancy intervention
  • Any previous stand-down or suspension from school
19-25 years old, high-level:
  • No qualifications held
  • More than 180 days benefit entitlement, and no enrolment in education this year
19-25 years old, other:
  • Up to 180 days benefit entitlement, and no enrolment in education this year
  • No qualifications held beyond NCEA level 2

Exclusion and disadvantage is a composite indicator derived from the experiences of young people with the care and protection sector, with the justice sector, and who have been disadvantaged in terms of education and employment as described above.

Serious exclusion and disadvantage is defined as:

Young people who have experienced exclusion and disadvantage across all three areas.

Moderate exclusion and disadvantage is defined as:

Young people who have experienced exclusion and disadvantage in two areas, including at least one high-level.

Deprivation index is based on the deprivation of the neighbourhood (meshblock) that the young person lives in. This is based on the NZ Deprivation Index produced by the University of Otago Department of Public Health.

Area type is a simplified categorisation of the type of neighbourhood (meshblock) that the young person lives in, based on StatsNZ’s Statistical standard for geographic areas.

Large City is comprised of major urban and large urban areas.

Regional Centre is comprised of medium urban and small urban areas.

Rural is comprised of all rural areas – that is, any land-based areas outside urban areas.

The data explorer uses the IDI’s source ranked ethnicity data. This approach consolidates ethnicity data from a range of administrative sources and allows for identification of multiple ethnicities for each individual.

The OHI Data Navigator data dictionary sets out a more comprehensive description of the data elements presented in the tool.